CHRISTMAS TREE IN THE PHILIPPINES

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If you are going to visit the Philippines during “Ber” months, you would notice that every shopping mall is selling out glittering and dazzling beautiful Christmas trees with different designs, sizes and types. A foreigner to this nation who is unaccustomed with this season will wonder and say that it’s too early for all this stuff but for Filipinos, it’s already high time to have it displayed in their houses.

Origin of Christmas Tree in the Philippines

According to Philippine history, the display of Christmas tree in every Filipino houses was brought and influenced by the American colonizers in the early 1900s but has been popular in Europe since 1800s.

There is a legend from Pangasinan that says, the first Christmas tree in the Philippines was planted in 1324 by the Franciscan friar Odoric of Pordenone who travelled around Asia in the early 1300s where he also held the very first Christmas mass in the country. However, this can’t be considered to be factual information to support the origin of Christmas tree in the Philippines.

The Philippines’ national hero, Dr. Jose Rizal introduced and brought the idea about the Christmas tree in his letter to his eldest sister and her husband when he was in Berlin in November 1886. He simply described to them how Christmas is celebrated in Germany and Spain and how does a forest pine tree decorated with glitter, lights, paper, candies, fruits etc. and placed inside the house where everyone celebrates Christmas around it.

Christmas Tree for Sale in the Philippines

Christmas tree is considered to be one of the famous symbols of Christmas therefore every Filipinos desire to have it displayed in their houses during the season. For them it’s beyond the display and the ornaments, but it’s more of conveying a message of love, unity, and bond in every member of the family. Because of this, we will not be surprise to see it in shopping malls and other local department stores with such an incredible price that can be afford by anyone.

Everybody is out around the market canvassing for the best price of Christmas tree. Shopping malls also are giving some discounts to their items so that more people will be drawn to purchase their Christmas trees.

Christmas Tree Decorations in the Philippines

The emblematic Christmas tree has Christmas lights on it and a big star put at the top of it. But nowadays, there are varieties of ornaments that can be hanged on the tree that adds exquisiteness and beauty to it. Some are quite expensive but some are very affordable. Some of these ornaments are ribbons, artificial golden coloured leaves, empty boxes with glittering red and gold ribbons, colourful dazzling balls and tinsels that come in various sizes and shapes.

The beauty and outcome of a Christmas tree depends on how artistic and resourceful the person or people who decorated it.

Christmas Tree Prices in the Philippines

Christmas tree prices in the Philippines is quite affordable than of any other countries because of the ample supply of commodity and the high percentage of competition among shopping malls and department store. They are doing some promotions and gimmicks that attract customers to buy theirs products. You will also see raging discounts everywhere you go.

If you have a P1,500.00 or $30 you can already buy a 7ft. Christmas tree with ornaments and lights in a shopping mall in Divisoria, Manila. If you still want to purchase a Christmas tree in SM Malls or Ayala Malls, you can choose of any kind of Christmas tree that suits your taste for around P3,000.00-P5,000.00 or  $75-$125.

Christmas tree in the Philippines adds attraction for people who want to visit the country. And it will leave a mark in the heart of those who will experience and celebrate this season.

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